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Reuters: World News
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:34:08 -0400
(1) Lack of protective gear leaves Mexican nurses battling pandemic in fear
As a nurse on the front lines of Mexico's coronavirus battle, Gisela Hernandez has stayed away from her children for nearly two months, sleeping in a hotel and even her car to avoid infecting them because she feels inadequately protected at work.


(2) Most vulnerable in England can spend time outdoors from Monday
The more than 2 million people who have been "shielding" from COVID-19 in England because they are deemed to be clinically extremely vulnerable will be allowed to spend time outdoors from Monday for the first time in 10 weeks.


(3) Iran berates U.S. over police killing, slams racism
Iran, always keen to score points against its longtime foe the United States, took Washington to task on Saturday over the killing of a black man by a white police officer that has sparked angry protests over racial injustice.


(4) Russia plans coronavirus vaccine clinical trials in two weeks: report
Russian scientists plan to start clinical trials within two weeks on a vaccine to combat the novel coronavirus, the health minister was quoted as saying on Saturday as authorities approved the country's first anti-COVID-19 drug.


(5) Israeli police fatally shoot Palestinian in Jerusalem: spokesman
Israeli police officers fatally shot a Palestinian they suspected was carrying a weapon in Jerusalem's Old City on Saturday, a police spokesman said, but the man was later found to have been unarmed, Israeli media reported.



Reuters: U.S.
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:37:31 -0400
(1) U.S. protests over Minneapolis death rage on amid political finger-pointing
The full Minnesota National Guard was activated for the first time since World War Two after four nights of civil unrest that has spread to other U.S. cities following the death of a black man shown on video gasping for breath as a white Minneapolis policeman knelt on his neck.


(2) U.S. military units put on four-hour standby amid Minnesota unrest
In an extraordinary move, the Pentagon on Saturday said it put military units on a four-hour recall status to be ready if requested by Minnesota's governor amid civil unrest following the killing of a black man by a white Minneapolis police officer.


(3) NASA resumes human spaceflight from U.S. soil with historic SpaceX launch
SpaceX, the private rocket company of billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, launched two Americans toward orbit from Florida on Saturday in a mission that marks the first spaceflight of NASA astronauts from U.S. soil in nine years.


(4) Drugs standards group nixes plan to kick pharma's crab blood habit
Horseshoe crabs' icy-blue blood will remain the drug industry's standard for safety tests after a powerful U.S. group ditched a plan to give equal status to a synthetic substitute pushed by Swiss biotech Lonza and animal welfare groups.


(5) FBI's top lawyer resigns as agency faces pressure from Trump
The FBI said on Saturday that its top lawyer, Dana Boente, had announced his resignation as the agency faces scrutiny over its investigations of former staffers and supporters of President Donald Trump.



Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.




















Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:28:02 -0400


(1) George Floyd protest updates: Kamala Harris attends protest at White House

George Floyd protest updates: Kamala Harris attends protest at White HouseThe death of George Floyd, a black man seen in a video pinned down by a white police officer and who later died, has caused outrage in Minneapolis and across the United States. What started as mostly peaceful protests earlier in the week have turned into chaos. In the wake of Floyd's death, murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, one of four officers at the scene, all of whom have been fired.




(2) Brazil's coronavirus outbreak worsens as total cases near 500,000

Brazil's coronavirus outbreak worsens as total cases near 500,000Brazil registered a record 33,274 new cases of the novel coronavirus on Saturday, its health ministry said, raising the total to 498,440 in a country with one of the world's worst outbreaks. The death toll in Brazil from COVID-19, the respiratory illness caused by the coronavirus, increased to 28,834, with 956 new deaths in the last 24 hours, the ministry said.




(3) FBI's top lawyer, Dana Boente, ousted amid Fox News criticism for role in Flynn investigation

FBI's top lawyer, Dana Boente, ousted amid Fox News criticism for role in Flynn investigationBoente was asked to resign on Friday and two sources familiar with the decision to dismiss him said it came from high levels of the Justice Department rather than directly from FBI Director Christopher Wray.




(4) Philadelphia protest peaceful before tone changed

Philadelphia protest peaceful before tone changedInitially peaceful protests in Philadelphia took on a different tone later Saturday afternoon after a car was set on fire and a crowd tried to gain access to a municipal building.




(5) George Floyd protests — live: Cities across the US set curfews and brace for unrest as Trump puts army police on standby

George Floyd protests — live: Cities across the US set curfews and brace for unrest as Trump puts army police on standbyProtests continued for a fifth straight day in cities across the US following the death of George Floyd, an African American man who was killed when he was pinned to the ground by Minneapolis police officers and choked with a knee pressed against his throat.One of the officers involved, Derek Chauvin, was charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter earlier in the day but that action did nothing to prevent fresh scenes of violence and arson erupting across the city as well as in other locations like Atlanta, New York, Los Angeles, Detroit, Chicago, Boston and Dallas.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:38:02 -0400


(1) George Floyd protests continue nationwide as hundreds arrested, cities issue curfews

George Floyd protests continue nationwide as hundreds arrested, cities issue curfewsMore national protests took place Saturday as demonstrators reacted to the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody on Memorial Day.




(2) My Money: 'Our alternative quarantine holiday'

My Money: 'Our alternative quarantine holiday'Alyssa Hulme from Utah in the US takes us through her weekly spending during the coronavirus pandemic.




(3) Protests over George Floyd escalate near White House as Trump warns against 'mob violence'

Protests over George Floyd escalate near White House as Trump warns against 'mob violence'As police and protesters clashed for a second day near the White House, Trump offered a warning to "rioters, looters and anarchists" against violence.




(4) Remember Lake of the Ozarks party pics? Many other places boomed Memorial Day, data show

Remember Lake of the Ozarks party pics? Many other places boomed Memorial Day, data showThe number of people entering businesses in some 400 U.S. ZIP codes doubled Memorial Day, and some destinations beat 2019, despite coronavirus.




(5) Chinese Factories Humming Again Doesn’t Mean Everyone Is Buying

Chinese Factories Humming Again Doesn’t Mean Everyone Is Buying(Bloomberg) -- China’s factories are starting to hum again, but executives are now worried that the rebound could falter on weak demand at home and abroad.Justin Yu, a sales manager at Zhejiang-based Pinghu Mijia Child Product Co. that makes toy scooters sold for American retailers, is among those seeing their order book improve from the depths of the coronavirus lockdown, but remain well below normal.“We are seeing more orders coming in this month as we get closer to our normal peak season,” Yu said. “But our orders are still 40-50% lower than last year.” The factory’s production capacity is running at about 70% to 80%, and Yu is making to order to avoid any build up in stock.The disconnect between China’s recovering production and still dormant demand is already showing up in data revealing a rise in inventories. The worry is that sustained overproduction will lead China’s factories to keep cutting prices, compounding global deflationary headwinds and worsening trade tensions, before they eventually cut back on production and therefore jobs.“The supply normalization has already outpaced demand recovery,” said Yao Wei, China economist at Societe Generale SA. “In other words, the recovery so far is a deflationary recovery.”Given the weak export outlook, manufacturers such as Fujian Strait Textile Technology Co. are switching their business models to target the home market. It used to sell 60% of its products to Europe and the U.S. before the coronavirus crisis wiped out those sales. Now, Dong Liu, the company’s vice president, is looking for opportunities at home.“Our company executives have started to visit the local market to make more potential clients know about us,” he said. “Since May 26, we have been producing 24 hours everyday at full capacity. All the inventory has already been sold and we’re rushing to make goods.”But the domestic strategy isn’t without its challenges. While China’s consumers are largely free to resume their regular lives as fresh virus cases slow to a trickle, they just aren’t spending like they used to.Retail sales slid 7.5% in April, more than the projected 6% drop. Restaurant and catering receipts slumped by 31.1% from a year earlier, after a 46.8% collapse in March.What Bloomberg’s Economists Say...“Although demand conditions are improving on the margin, they will still take a long time to recover to where they were before the virus crisis. Investment is picking up, domestic consumption improving and external demand is less bad than it was.”\-- Chang Shu, Bloomberg EconomicsIn Zhenjiang, Jiangsu province, Melissa Shu, an export manager for an LED car lighting factory, said although orders are steadily improving, there’s no sense of urgency from her clients and the outlook remains uncertain.“We’re just making goods slowly,” Shu said. “We are worried about the coming months.”Some producers may be hoping for a real-life enactment of Say’s law, a part of economic theory which suggests that ultimately supply will create its own demand, as long as prices and wages are flexible.Another scenario is that industry self corrects, according to UBS Group AG’s Chief China Economist Wang Tao. She points to strong steel production during the depths of the coronavirus lockdown, even when demand was weak. Higher inventories means that even as demand recovers, steel production won’t show much of a pick up. And once producers know that orders are falling, they will adjust output.“I do not think supply will outstrip demand for long – once inventories build up, or producers know orders are falling, production will come down as well,” she said.That could pose other problems though, especially as unemployment rises. Premier Li Keqiang in a press conference on Thursday highlighted job creation as a critical priority for the government.The urgency to create jobs may mean there’s even less likelihood of a shake up of state owned companies in the heavy industrial sectors that have historically fueled excess production.The disconnect is already clear in data points that show, for example, stronger coal consumption by power plants and rising blast furnace operating rates by steel mills, while at the same time gauges for property and car sales are improving more slowly. That combination will drag on China’s growth over the coming months, according to economists at Citigroup Inc.The problem for China’s industrial sector -- due to its massive output -- is that it really needs both local and global demand to be strong. If both are weak, it’s clearly a dire outlook. But if local demand recovers and global demand doesn’t, there are still problems.“At the end of the day, China’s economy is driven by demand and right now there is no demand,” Viktor Shvets, head of Asian strategy at Macquarie Commodities and Global Markets, told Bloomberg Radio.A scenario where manufacturers capacity originally dedicated to the export market is retooled to produce for the home market instead would still lead to overproduction. Then the supply-demand mismatch would end up adding to deflationary pressures and a pose fresh headwinds to economic growth, according to Bo Zhuang, chief China economist at research firm TS Lombard.For now, China’s factory owners are hoping it won’t come to that.Grace Gao, an export manager at Shandong Pangu Industrial Co. that makes tools like hammers and axes -- around 60% of their goods go to Europe -- is seeing orders come in as her clients get up and running again. But even as things pick up, Gao remains hesitant to call a full recovery.“Our clients are facing unprecedented problems,” she said. “It’s still hard to estimate when we’ll get back on our feet.”For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.comSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:38:02 -0400


(1) Neon waves caused by algae make ocean glow in California

Neon waves caused by algae make ocean glow in CaliforniaA mesmerising neon light show has been glowing along the shores of Southern California.The phenomenon is caused by colonies of algae, simple plants that live in water, which bloomed in March along a stretch of coastline from Baja to Los Angeles.




(2) NASA and SpaceX make history by launching Americans into space from US soil

NASA and SpaceX make history by launching Americans into space from US soilNASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley are on a roughly 19-hour journey to the International Space Station. It’s a mission nearly a decade in the making.




(3) Watch continuing coverage of SpaceX crewed launch to the International Space Station

Watch continuing coverage of SpaceX crewed launch to the International Space StationSpaceX is once again preparing to make history – the private spaceflight company is set to launch its Crew Dragon Demo-2 mission in collaboration with NASA today. The launch will take off from Cape Canaveral in Florida, and once again weather is a concern for today's launch window. SpaceX and NASA have an instantaneous launch window today, which means they only have the one shot to take off – if the weather isn't cooperating at 3:22 PM EDT, they'll have to re-attempt the launch again, with the next possible window set for tomorrow, Sunday May 31.




(4) Dragon-riding astronauts join exclusive inner circle at NASA

Dragon-riding astronauts join exclusive inner circle at NASAAstronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken join NASA’s exclusive inner circle by catching a ride on a SpaceX rocket and capsule. It’s only the fifth time that NASA has put people aboard a brand new spacecraft line for liftoff. And it’s the first time the spacecraft belongs to a for-profit company in charge of the launch. The retired Marine colonel and former fighter pilot flew on NASA’s last space shuttle flight in 2011, closing out a 30-year era.




(5) Millipede from Scotland is world's oldest-known land animal

Millipede from Scotland is world's oldest-known land animalA fossilized millipede-like creature discovered in Scotland may represent the oldest-known land animal, a humble pioneer of terrestrial living 425 million years ago that helped pave the way for the throngs that would eventually inhabit Earth's dry parts. Researchers said the fossil of the Silurian Period creature, called Kampecaris obanensis and unearthed on the island of Kerrera in the Scottish Inner Hebrides, inhabited a lakeside environment and likely ate decomposing plants. Fossils of the oldest-known plant with a stem, called Cooksonia, were found in the same ancient lake region as Kampecaris.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:04 -0400


(1)  Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sides

 Trump's 'looting' and 'shooting' remark draws outrage from all sidesTrump attempted to walk back his comments on Friday afternoon but not before receiving condemnation from a far-right group and a pop star.




(2) Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safely

Lessons from Japan on containing coronavirus could help U.S. reopen safelyIn many ways, Japan’s experience of the coronavirus pandemic has paralleled America’s, and yet Japan’s outbreak has stalled — at much lower levels of infection and death.




(3) How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?

How should the U.S. respond to China's Hong Kong power grab?The Chinese government passed a law giving it sweeping new powers to stamp out dissent on the semiautonomous island of Hong Kong. Should the U.S. and others nations push back?




(4) Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? The CDC says that it may be possible to contract COVID-19 by coming in contact with a surface or object that has the virus on it, but you're much more likely to get the coronavirus through person-to-person transmission.




(5) Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed

Israel police kill Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armedIsraeli police in annexed east Jerusalem on Saturday shot dead a disabled Palestinian they mistakenly thought was armed with a pistol, prompting furious condemnation from the Palestinians. The incident happened in the alleys of the walled Old City near Lions' Gate, an access point mainly used by Palestinians. "Police units on patrol there spotted a suspect with a suspicious object that looked like a pistol," an Israeli police statement said.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:33:02 -0400


(1) Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’

Viola Davis’s message to white women: ‘Get to know me’But Davis does see a path forward: empathy and becoming educated on one another’s experiences.




(2) Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassion

Swizz Beatz, Alicia Keys’s husband, says hip-hop industry lacks compassionIconic hip-hop producer and Alicia Keys’s husband, Swizz Beatz, isn’t afraid to tell his guy friends he loves them.




(3) Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki Says

Mike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison, Snooki SaysMike 'The Situation' Sorrentino Is 'Having the Time of His Life' in Prison




(4) 'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record

'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record'Avengers: Endgame' tops 'Star Wars,' breaks previous pre-sale record originally appeared on goodmorningamerica.com"Avengers: Endgame" tickets went on sale Tuesday and just like Thanos' famous snap, they were gone just like that. But way more than half.Fandango is reporting that "Endgame" has broken its pre-sale records, topping the previous holder, "Star Wars: The Force Awakens."(MORE: New 'Avengers: Endgame' trailer features Captain Marvel, the battle to beat Thanos)Guess the force is strong with Earth's mightiest heroes. ...




(5) Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctors

Selma Blair reveals she cried with relief at MS diagnosis after being 'not taken seriously' by doctorsThe 46-year-old actress is now revealing the agony she went through before receiving a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) last August."Ever since my son was born, I was in an MS flare-up and didn't know, and I was giving it everything to seem normal," Blair told Robin Roberts in an interview that aired Tuesday on "Good Morning America." "And I was self-medicating when he wasn't with me. Blair recalled that she would get so fatigued prior to her diagnosis that she would need to pull over to take a nap after dropping her son, now 7, off at his school one mile away from their home. During her interview with "GMA" at her Los Angeles home, Blair was in an "exacerbation" of MS, or an attack that causes new symptoms or the worsening of existing symptoms.
























Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Last updated Sat, 30 May 2020 19:28:02 -0400


(1) Do star athletes make too much money?

Do star athletes make too much money?With athletes in America's biggest sports leagues raking in salaries worth $300 million and more, is it time to reign in the big spending or do superstars deserve the big bucks they make?




(2) Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?

Live animal mascots: Cute or exploitative?Animal rights activists have repeatedly called for college sports teams to stop using real animals as their mascots. Are these complaints fair or an overreaction?




(3) Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?

Does U.S. women's soccer deserve equal pay?Has the U.S. women's soccer team done enough to warrant salaries that match their male counterparts? The 360 gives you all the angles on heavily-debated topics in the news.




(4) After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior Games

After fighting for 9/11 victims, Jon Stewart turns to Warrior GamesThe former “Daily Show” host is serving as the host and emcee of this week’s 2019 Department of Defense Warrior Games in Tampa, where about 300 wounded, ill or injured active-duty and veteran military athletes are competing in 14 adaptive sports.




(5) Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game

Kevin Love talks anxiety, depression and the time he thought he was going to die mid-game“Dear Men” explores how men are navigating the evolution of manhood. NBA All-Star Kevin Love’s mental health journey began in a moment of anxiety on the basketball court during a November 2017 game against the Atlanta Hawks.
























The world this week
Last updated Mon, 25 May 2020 15:26:07 +0000
(1) Politics this week
(2) KAL’s cartoon
(3) Business this week
(4) Politics this week
(5) Business this week
























The Economist: Business
Last updated
(1) Working life has entered a new era
(2) How big oil is trying to win back investors
(3) Business lessons from the Pentagon
(4) The Renault-Nissan alliance hunkers down
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Law and Daily Life
The FindLaw Life, Family and Workplace Law Blog.
Last updated 2020-05-28T14:05:10Z


(1) No Shirt, No Mask, No Service?
2020-05-28T13:05:53Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Many stores and businesses now require face masks on customers. Can they legally do that?

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

Can a commercial establishment legally refuse to let you in the door if you're not wearing a protective face mask? Or ask you to leave if you're already inside?

Absolutely. You've probably seen many a sign saying, "No shirt, no shoes, no service." As long as stores aren't violating the federal Civil Rights Act by singling out a class of people for exclusion, their property is private property.

They can impose dress rules and behavioral rules. They can ask you to leave, or kick you out, just because they don't like your looks ? as long as they're not violating the Civil Rights Act, that is.

States and Cities Stepping in With Face Mask Rules

But as the coronavirus continues its relentless spread across the land, store owners in some states and cities don't even have a choice in the face-mask matter. Several states and many cities have instituted rules requiring people over the age of 2 to wear masks when they are in "public settings," which include stores.

Under an order by Governor Andrew Cuomo, people who break the rules in New York could face a fine of up to $1,000. The fine is $300 in Massachusetts, where several cities have their own requirements, including some with the threat of $1,000 fines. The statewide order in Massachusetts specifically states that businesses may refuse entry to anyone who refuses to wear a mask for nonmedical reasons.

The rigid rules have been spreading out of the country's from the large coastal cities to inland municipalities like Minneapolis, which began imposing a strict mask rule on May 26. Anyone inside a Minneapolis store over the age of 2 must now wear a face mask unless they have a medical excuse. Rulebreakers may face fines of up to $1,000.

Stores Setting Their Own Rules

In other parts of the country, however, mask wearing is subject only to governmental advisories and recommendations. And that means that stores are free to set their own rules.

When stores have chosen to set mask-wearing rules, as Costco did on May 4, the result has sometimes been conflict. Some people believe that the coronavirus risk has been overblown and the governmental response to it too strict. They believe measures like face-mask requirements trample on their constitutional freedoms.

These people are correct in saying that the wearing of masks inside stores is a question of rights ? but it's a question of the store owner's rights. Again, a store is private property and the owner can set up any reasonable nondiscriminatory rules governing who can come in. They can even refuse entrance to someone who is wearing a mask, as several bar and store owners have done.

The risk for businesses, of course, is an economic one. Companies that began requiring face masks are trying to strike a balance between providing greater safety for their customers and losing business from those who don't like the rules.

Costco might be losing some business from a boycott that's been organized in opposition to their face-mask rule. But it seems unlikely that they'll be sued.

Related Resources:

 





(2) Are Employers Required to Reimburse Employees While Working From Home?
2020-05-28T13:05:33Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Employees working from home due to the coronavirus may need to spend money to get their workplace up to speed? To what extent can they be reimbursed by their employers?

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

Working from home, as millions more of us are doing now because of the coronavirus, has several advantages. No wasted time on commutes. Fewer interruptions. Better work/life balance.

And with the spread of COVID-19, of course, perhaps the biggest advantage: Reduced likelihood of getting seriously sick.

On the negative side of the ledger, at-home workers may incur necessary expenses to do their jobs. For many employees told to work from home, the task of putting together a home office can be challenging. They may have had an outdated old laptop, inadequate Internet bandwidth to handle multi-party Zoom calls, no proper workspace, no ergonomically correct office chair.

What Are Employers' Obligations?

Getting up to speed can be expensive. So, is your employer legally required to reimburse you for these new expenses?

The answer is that it largely depends on where you live.

An employee who is asked to work from home can always ask their employer to compensate them for any expenses necessary to set up a home office. But only some states require employers to do so. These include California, Illinois, Iowa, Massachusetts, Montana, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia.

Like most of the other states who require it, California says that employers must reimburse at-home workers for "all necessary expenditures or losses" they incur while performing their jobs. Exactly what qualifies as "necessary expenditures" can vary from state to state, however. Presumably, items like paper, pens, and printer cartridges would be included. So would cell-phone and Internet use, although employer and employee would likely have to come to agreement on percentages.

Nationally, the U.S. Labor Department has not placed any strict reimbursement requirements on employers when they tell employees to work remotely. DOL issued an advisory in March that employers can't require employees working at home to pay for business expenses when it reduces the employee's earnings below required minimum-wage levels. But the agency said nothing about whether an employer must reimburse at-home employees for their expenses.

That advisory followed a declaration by President Trump that the pandemic is a national emergency. Trump's declaration gave employers the power to make tax-free payments (and receive corresponding tax deductions) to employees who are impacted by COVID-19. The payments can't be for income replacement but can be reimbursements for qualified expenses that employees face as a result of the pandemic. Those expenses include the cost of setting up and operating a home office.

No Home Office Write-Offs for W-2 Employees

Employees who are familiar with the home-office tax deduction may be disappointed to learn that the write-off only exists now for self-employed people. Following the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, W-2 employees can no longer take that deduction. Nor can they deduct any office-related expenses on their taxes.

So, if you think you deserve reimbursements for home-office expenses, the best option is to ask your employer. In some states ? the ones listed above ? they're required by law to compensate you for reasonable expenses. In other states, just hope that your employer is reasonable.

The ergonomically correct office chair might be a tough sell, though.

Related Resources:

 





(3) What Happens if You Can't Renew Your Driver's License?
2020-05-22T15:05:11Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: DMV closures are leaving many people confused about how to renew expiring licenses. FindLaw's Law and Daily Life helps break down your options.

Written by: Andrew Leonatti

Article:

The hours waiting. The surly employees. The depressing (if there is any) decor. The fees that always seem to get more expensive. A trip to your DMV is never fun. Ever. This is even before the coronavirus pandemic hit.

But what do you do if your driver's license is expiring? With office closures or fears of entering offices during the pandemic, it's no longer just hopeless boredom while waiting in the DMV that people have to dread. And it's not like you can wait in your car. (You just know they're going to use the little paper tickets until the end of time.)

Driver's Licenses Are Essential

Joking aside, you need your driver's license. If you have to leave your house for work and there is no public transportation, your license is essential. And driving on an expired license can get you locked into a vicious cycle of penalties, including fines and suspensions.

Additionally, if you have a commercial driver's license, an expired license means you can't work.

Driver's licenses also serve more purposes than just making it legal to be behind the wheel. Most people rely on their license as their one-size-fits-all photo ID to use at the airport, to purchase alcoholic beverages, and to vote. Many places will not accept an expired license as proof of age or identity.

Extensions Are Now the Norm

Thankfully, nearly every state government realized the importance of giving everyone facing an expired license a bit of a grace period. DMVs are a state government function, so the circumstances in every state are different. For example:

Those states that haven't provided any extensions are allowing online renewals.

Don't Drive if You Shouldn't

In every state that has granted extensions for expiring licenses, these extensions do not apply to people driving on suspended or revoked driver's licenses. If police pull you over, and your license was suspended because of a DUI or some type of traffic violation, these extensions will not help you. You could still leave yourself exposed to criminal penalties.

Related Resources:





(4) How Legal Is It to Badmouth Your Ex Online During a Divorce?
2020-05-19T09:05:41Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Massachusetts' top court says bashing your ex online is free speech.

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

Divorce often brings out the worst in people.

Even the most even-keeled of spouses can lose it emotionally when the marital final curtain comes down. Suddenly, their partner's bad habits, weird sexual tics, and tawdry indiscretions become fair game to share with the world.

It's time to air some dirty laundry.

This impulse has probably been around since marriage first existed. But since the Internet gained popular use 20 years ago, the nuclear option of airing dirty laundry online has been irresistible for many warring spouses.

The Dampening Effect of Non-Disparagement Orders

Fortunately for everyone concerned, judges tend to have cooler heads in dealing with these battles and can usually be relied upon to issue "non-disparagement orders" to muzzle the angry combatants. These orders, which are common, are designed to prevent the parties from criticizing each other in public, in front of their children, and to third parties.

But do they impinge on constitutional free speech?

For the most part, at least, courts have said no. In one heavily publicized divorce involving NBA basketball star Steve Nash and his ex, for instance, the issue of whether post-divorce online dirty laundry is free speech attracted widespread attention. In that case, the couple's joint custody agreement contained the standard non-disparagement order requiring them to be respectful of each other regarding their three children. Nash's ex, however, began tweeting bad things about him, Nash went back to court seeking a halt to her activity, and the court agreed.

She fought back, however, contending that the order didn't cover her online activity, which was free speech. The Arizona Court of Appeals disagreed, upholding the lower court's ruling that the non-disparagement clause covered online comments.

Landmark Decision in Massachusetts

On May 7, however, one state's top court drew a radically different conclusion about divorce-related online speech. The Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court ruled that a non-disparagement clause that specifically prohibited online discussion of the divorce was unconstitutional.

In that case, the fight was between Ronnie and Masha Shak and involved their one-year-old son. According to the New York Times, Ronnie Shak offered running commentary on the divorce proceedings, sharing it with the couple's rabbi, assistant rabbi, and members of their synagogue.

He also created a GoFundMe page entitled "Help Me KEEP MY SON," and called his ex an "evil liar."

A family court judge granted Ms. Shak's motion to halt her ex's online activities, but also put it on hold for review by the Supreme Judicial Court. On May 7, that court ruled that non-disparagement orders are unconstitutional.

"(A)s important as it is to protect a child from the emotional and psychological harm that might follow from one parent's use of vulgar or disparaging words about the other," Justice Kimberly S. Budd wrote, "merely reciting that interest is not enough to satisfy the heavy burden" of restricting speech.

The ruling did note that an ex who is the target of online badmouthing does have recourse: They can sue for defamation.

But, at least in Massachusetts, it's apparently legal now to go online and air as much divorce-related dirty laundry as you want.

Related Resources:

 





(5) Can the Government Prohibit Social Gatherings During COVID-19?
2020-05-18T12:05:34Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Summer is usually the perfect time for cookouts and hangouts with family and friends. But are any of these things allowed during the pandemic?

Written by: Kellie Pantekoek, Esq.

Article:

The short answer is, yes, the government can and is prohibiting social gatherings in many areas of the United States right now in response to the global coronavirus pandemic. But the government's powers are not absolute, and some areas of the country are beginning to ease up restrictions on certain types of gatherings.

Is Summer 2020 #Canceled?

If you are wondering if summer 2020 is #canceled, you are not alone. With graduation around the corner as well as wedding season, Father's Day, festivals, sports, Fourth of July, boating, and other summer recreation, Americans want to know how limited their summer plans will be thanks to COVID-19 restrictions.

Ultimately, the restrictions in place this summer will depend on your state's laws, and particularly, if there is an executive order such as a stay-at-home or shelter-in-place order in effect. State governments have the power to order people to stay home and businesses to close based on the state constitution, statutes, or regulations. Some states also grant cities and towns this same authority, allowing them to take their own actions.

If there is a stay-home or shelter-in-place order in effect, you may be prohibited from leaving the house unless it is to engage in permissible activities like getting groceries, exercising, going to your job, or caring for relatives.

Under these terms, a social gathering of any size would likely not be permitted. Most states are working with police to enforce stay-home orders, but tickets and arrests are only taking place in extreme cases.

Are Stay-at-Home Orders Constitutional?

There has been frustration (and even protests) in response to stay-at-home orders in many parts of the country, with some people questioning states' rights to restrict citizens' movement. Some point to the Constitution and its protection of citizens' rights to associate, travel, and assemble, and the fact that the U.S. Constitution supersedes state law.

It is the courts that decide if a government order violates the Constitution, either ?on its face," which argues that the law in its entirety is unconstitutional, or ?as applied," which argues that the way the order affects a particular person is unconstitutional.

The ?strict scrutiny" test would likely be applied, which would require the challenged law to be ?narrowly tailored to further a compelling government interest." In other words, are the restrictions being placed on individual freedoms unnecessary?

Lawsuits have already been filed in many jurisdictions on this very question, and so far at least one has been successful. On May 13, the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled that the state's stay-at-home order was "unlawful" and overturned it. The lawsuit was filed by Republican lawmakers in the state and the decision has drawn national attention.

Other rulings have declared that constitutional liberties are not absolute, and that stay home orders have involved necessary, albeit disruptive, restrictions.

It's important to keep in mind that the situation is fluid, so stay-at-home orders will have to be adjusted based on the changing public health threats of the coronavirus pandemic in order to remain ?narrowly tailored to further a compelling government interest."

States Begin Rolling Back Stay-at-Home Orders

As stay-at-home orders are slowly eased up throughout the country, the issue of what is allowed and what is not allowed will depend entirely on where you live. Many states have unveiled plans that roll back stay-at-home orders and reopen businesses in phases based on benchmarks with testing, deaths, hospital readiness, and other factors, while others have reopened or are planning to reopen without meeting criteria recommended by the White House.

What Does All of This Mean to Me?

Can you see your friends and family? Can your wedding still take place? Here are some things to think about as you reconsider your summer plans.

Graduations

Many high schools and colleges throughout the country have already held or scheduled online graduation ceremonies in lieu of celebrating in person. Others have decided to postpone in-person ceremonies under a later date.

As far as graduation parties go, you should check your state and local laws to determine if a gathering is permissible, and if so, what kind of social distancing accommodations will need to be made.

Weddings and Large Events

If you are planning a wedding or another large event during the summer, you will want to stay in communication with your venue operator and vendors, who can let you know if their businesses are allowed to operate. According to Brides.com, wedding planners are recommending that weddings planned through July should likely be postponed.

You may also want to look for guidance from your state health department or the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on precautions that should be taken during events to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The CDC has extensive guidance for getting your wedding or mass gathering event ready, and when postponing or cancelling an event is recommended.

Of course, be sure to check with state and local law to make sure that your gathering is permissible under current pandemic-related orders.

Get-togethers with Family and Friends

Summer is usually the perfect time for cookouts and hangouts with family and friends. But what is permissible during the pandemic? This, again, will depend on where you live and the current orders that are in place.

Currently, the CDC advises avoiding gatherings of any size outside your household, which includes visiting a friend's house, parks, restaurants, or shops. The CDC is clear that teens and younger adults are included in this guidance. However, many states have adopted their own recommendations.

Summer of 2020 isn't officially #canceled, even though many of the events, festivals, concerts, and attractions you were planning on attending might be. The good news is that in most states, parks, lakes, and trails are open, which means you can still enjoy the great outdoors (while keeping your social distance).

Related Resources:





(6) Can Your Employer Fire You for Raising Safety Concerns Over Coronavirus?
2020-05-12T15:05:09Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Complaining about safety concerns when you return to work from a COVID-19 lockdown could get you fired. But there are laws that may back you up.

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

In most cases, an employer can legally fire you if you refuse to come back to work following a coronavirus-related business shutdown. Fear of the coronavirus isn't generally a good enough argument to stay away and keep collecting unemployment.

But what if they fire you if you complain about inadequate safety measures?

In that case, you may have a better legal argument to make.

Has Amazon Retaliated Against Whistleblowers?

Alleged retaliatory firings of whistleblowers by Amazon, for instance, have attracted the attention of the New York Attorney General's office. A Staten Island warehouse worker, Christian Smalls, filed a complaint to the state health department on March 21, alleging that the facility wasn't being cleaned sufficiently, that infected workers were coming in and out, and that the six-foot distancing rule wasn't being followed.

On March 30, Smalls led a protest at the site during his lunch break, and that same day Amazon fired him.

National Public Radio obtained a letter from the office of New York Attorney General Letitia James saying that the office was investigating whether Amazon had broken federal worker safety laws and state whistleblower laws when it fired Smalls.

The letter noted that the preliminary findings of the investigation "raise serious concern that Amazon may have discharged [Smalls] in order to silence his complaints and send a threatening message to other employees that they should also keep quiet about any health and safety concerns."

The letter also said that the AG's office is investigating "other cases of potential illegal retaliation" in New York.

Elsewhere, Amazon has also drawn heat elsewhere for alleged lack of workplace safety, firing two employees in Seattle and one in Minnesota.

Because Amazon workers are "at-will" employees, like the vast majority of workers in the U.S., Amazon can legally fire them for no reason. However, when firings are illegal ? for instance, based on race or religion ? the fired workers have a legal argument that can provide a solid basis for a lawsuit or claim.

Steps You Can Take

In the case of retaliatory firings like those that Amazon is alleged to have committed, the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA) comes into play. In particular, OSHA contains two sections that apply:

Retaliatory firings can also violate state laws, which vary. Many states have their own versions of OSHA, and many are tougher.

Ann-Marie Ahern, a labor and employment lawyer in Cleveland, Ohio, told TIME magazine, "One of the challenges with understanding your rights as an employee is that each state has different rules and laws that can augment federal law. For instance, workers in California enjoy far more protection in the workplace than almost anywhere else in the U.S."

Meanwhile, there's an additional legal avenue for workers who are fired for walking off the job for safety concerns: The National Labor Relations Act.

The NLRA provides "concerted activity" protections for workers who refuse to come to work for safety reasons or for following an order they consider unsafe, such as not wearing a face mask.

The key is whether two or more employees feel endangered. If their employer fires them for their actions, they may have a claim and can do either online or in person at their local National Labor Relations Board office.

After reviewing claims, both OSHA and the NLRB may issue penalties and order job reinstatements.

Your employer has an obligation to provide and maintain a safe environment for you to work in. If you have spoken about an employer's failure to do so and been fired, you may have a claim to file via OSHA or NLRA. You might also want to speak to an experienced employment law attorney to ensure that your rights are protected.

Related Resources:

 





(7) If You Lose Your Job Due to Coronavirus, Do You Still Have to Pay Child Support?
2020-05-18T12:05:01Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: If you pay child support, losing your job due to the pandemic can be doubly painful. But you might be able to negotiate a reduced amount.

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

Losing your job due to a coronavirus-related business shutdown is bad enough. But if you have child support obligations, the loss of a paycheck can be doubly burdensome.

One of the first questions you might ask if you find yourself in that unfortunate situation is: Do I have to continue to pay child support?

The short answer is yes. Courts only rarely suspend child support orders.

But can you modify your child support order so that you pay less?

Maybe.

While banks, insurers, and even landlords are offering ways to suspend or lower payments these days, courts tend to be much stricter. Usually, monthly child-support payments can only be altered if you can demonstrate a "material change" in your financial situation ? and courts tend to be strict about that.

For instance, even though you might demonstrate a loss of income, courts will look at what your income potential might be. In California, for example, the statute governing child support states, "The court may, in its discretion, consider the earning capacity of a parent in lieu of the parent's income, consistent with the best interests of the children."

The requirements vary from state to state. New Jersey, for instance, requires people seeking modifications to show that the change is unanticipated, substantial, and permanent.

The "unanticipated" part seems easy. But many of the newly unemployed are making at least as much money from expanded unemployment compensation as they were when they were working. So it may be difficult to show that the change is substantial until the money runs out later in the year.

Court Closures Add to the Problem

An added problem is that child support payments can only be changed by court order ? and, for the most part, those courts are not currently open or are operating with abbreviated schedules due to coronavirus.

However, many courts allow people to file applications electronically. Family law practitioners say that even though courts may be closed, people should file applications now because when courts do open again an approved application may be retroactive to the date of filing.

It's important to keep in mind, however, that you must keep paying the same amount of child support as stipulated in the order ? even if you can't get a hearing because the courts are closed. If you don't, you may face penalties.

So, how tolerant might judges generally be in considering the plights of child-support payers who lost their jobs due to coronavirus?

Maybe the closest indicator would be the 2008 economic meltdown, which prompted a big spike in unemployment.

Attorney Valentina Shaknes recently told CNBC that, even then, courts were not forgiving in dealing with requests for support modifications.

"We kept hearing, 'Go get another job,'" she said.

But she added that the severity of the pandemic, with its higher unemployment statistics, could bring different responses from courts.

?My expectation is there will be some [adjustment] of these obligations," Shaknes said. ?The judges are not going to be able to say, 'Go get another job,' when there are [millions] filing for unemployment."

Work Out a New Plan With Your Ex?

Family-law practitioners say that it is a good idea to reach out to your ex-partner to work something out in the meantime, if possible. Drawing up a new payment plan by yourselves or with the help of your attorneys could be looked upon positively by a judge when the time comes for the court to act in issuing a modified payment plan.

If you lost your job due to the coronavirus and believe that you meet the requirements to file an application for a child-support modification, it's important to take steps now. If you can negotiate with your ex, don't waste time in examining that possibility. And file for a modification in your state court as soon as possible.

The whole procedure won't be quick and it may not be easy, but it is doable. It may be wise to talk to an experienced family law attorney about your options.

Related Resources:





(8) Mask Laws: From Illegal to Wear to Illegal NOT to Wear
2020-05-08T15:05:06Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Increasingly, Americans are being encouraged and required to wear face masks. What does the law say?

Written by: Richard Dahl

Article:

As recently as late March, public health authorities were saying people didn't need to wear face masks. They were important for medical personnel and health workers, of course, but unnecessary for others.

Then, on April 3, the Centers for Disease Control said that people should start using "cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials ... as an additional, voluntary public health measure."

It was becoming apparent the coronavirus was being carried around by a great many people who show no symptoms of illness yet may be spreading it by the simple act of breathing.

The authorities pointed out that while cloth masks didn't do much to keep people from breathing in any close-by coronavirus, they do help to keep you from breathing or sneezing them out. And you might unknowingly be an asymptomatic carrier.

So, in April we came to understand that masks are about protecting others. They are about being a good neighbor and a good citizen.

Governors and Mayors Take Action

Governors and mayors followed suit by issuing orders. One of the first, by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, went into effect April 10 and required all workers in "essential businesses" to wear masks and authorized those businesses to refuse service to maskless customers.

In late April, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine issued a similar order. Workers in Ohio are generally required to wear masks, while businesses have the option of requiring customers to wear them.

Other states have begun to implement tougher measures. Starting May 6 in Massachusetts, for instance, masks are mandatory for everyone inside stores or in any "place that is open to the public" and not able to maintain a distance of six feet from other people. Anyone who violates those requirements could face a $300 fine.

Butting Up Against Old Anti-Mask Laws

These state and local actions are executive orders ? not laws ? but mask laws do exist. In fact, there are many of them. But they are not anything like coronavirus orders. In fact, they are the opposite. Many states ? about 15 ? have laws that forbid you to wear masks.

These laws have various origins. Many are anti-terrorism laws aimed at the Ku Klux Klan. One of the oldest, New York's 1845 law, was more generally anti-criminal. That law made it illegal in 1845 to appear "disguised and armed" and was used, 166 years later, to charge masked Occupy Wall Street protesters.

So, if it's against the law in these states to wear masks, what's a police officer to do?

Two southern states have taken steps to guide them. In Alabama, Attorney General Steve Marshall issued a statement in April saying that state's 71-year-old anti-mask law will not be enforced against people who wear medical masks. In Georgia, Gov. Brian Kemp signed an executive order suspending that state's 70-year-old law.

But don't think that criminals are keeping an eye on these developments. There have been several incidents recently involving armed robbers wearing medical masks.

Meanwhile, the rest of us must make do with following the law and the governmental guidance as best we can. So it may not be surprising then that face masks are the hot fashion accessory of the moment.

If you have to wear a mask, you might as well make the most of it.

Related Resources:

 





(9) DeVos Releases New Guidelines for College Sexual Assault Proceedings
2020-05-08T11:05:56Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: New regulations from the Department of Education provide more protections for college students accused of sex crimes, and victims' rights groups are upset. Learn more on FindLaw's Law and Daily Life.

Written by: Andrew Leonatti

Article:

After years of discussion, criticism, and delays, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos unveiled final language for guidelines regulating campus judicial proceedings regarding sexual assault and harassment this week.

The regulations will drastically alter the rights of victims and defendants, along with how universities can handle and resolve allegations. It is also sure to meet a court challenge from opponents, who accuse the government of gutting protections for victims of sexual assaults.

Understanding the New Regulations

The new regulations amount to a drastic rewrite of Title IX (the shorthand for federal gender equality in education laws) regulations that oversee how campuses must handle allegations of sexual assault and sexual harassment in order to secure federal funds.

DeVos's proposed changes include:

The proposed regulations additionally both narrow and expand the definition of sexual harassment. They narrow the definition by stating that conduct must be "so severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive that it effectively denies a person equal access to the school's education program or activity."

But the new regulations also expand the definition of sexual harassment to include sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking and states that these acts are so objectively "severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive" that victims of those acts will not have to jump through extra hurdles to prove their claims.

DOE Says It's About Fairness

In a statement, DeVos said the new regulations are necessary because "Too many students have lost access to their education because their school inadequately responded when a student filed a complaint of sexual harassment or sexual assault."

DeVos believes the new rules correct what due process and conservative organizations believe was overreach by the Obama administration, which unfairly punished the accused and ruined reputations without establishing guilt. Those regulations came about after the Obama administration discovered numerous instances of colleges failing to investigate or covering up claims of sexual assault.

She also argued that despite additional protections for defendants, the new regulations provide strong protections for accusers and holds universities accountable if they do not take accusations seriously.

Critics Are Unsatisfied

After the regulations were first unveiled in 2018, DOE faced a torrent of criticism, including more than 120,000 public comments on the proposed regulations.

While DeVos delayed the publication of the final rule to meet with victims' rights organizations to try to address their concerns, many remain unconvinced.

?We will fight this rule in court, and we intend to win," said Emily Martin, a vice president at the National Women's Law Center. She said that DOE was reckless in ignoring evidence that many of the proposed changes would harm victims and increase the chances that they will not want to come forward.

So while the regulations go into effect in August, that is unlikely to be the last word on them.

Related Resources:





(10) Can You Legally Celebrate Mother's Day With Family This Year?
2020-05-06T13:05:41Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: Do stay-at-home orders mean you can't get together with mom this year? That depends where you live. Find out more on FindLaw's Law and Daily Life.

Written by: Andrew Leonatti

Article:

If you aren't spending time with your mom, is it really Mother's Day?

That's what millions of people (we're all some mom's child) across the country are asking themselves this week as Mother's Day approaches. Whether you were planning to travel or your mom lives just down the road, can a Mother's Day brunch still happen with, you know, mom, if stay-at-home orders are still in place?

Every State Is Different

It's important to remember that there are no federal stay-at-home guidelines in place. The state, county, or city where you live has to issue an order for there to be any restrictions on your movements.

Many of these orders also limit the amount of people who can gather for something like a Mother's Day or Father's Day celebration. For instance:

Some states, however, are starting to relax their restrictions, which means it may be easier to personally serve Mom her mimosas:

As always, it's important to see what the order in place for your specific location is. Even if you live in a state that's "reopened," there are likely still many restrictions in place.

Can the Police Do Anything?

At the start of the pandemic, many governors and mayors talked about how they hoped people would voluntarily comply with the stay-at-home orders, and that police enforcement wouldn't be necessary.

Well, that's definitely changed. Police in Minnesota have been issuing citations. Patience is also wearing thin in California. But many crusading sheriff's out there have also said they aren't going to enforce any stay-at-home orders.

So while in many places, the police can stop your Mother's Day party from happening, the bigger question is will they.

While we don't dispense medical advice, we will take this opportunity to note that just because you can get away with something, it doesn't mean that you should try it. Orders are in place for a reason, so be aware of the risks, and maybe think about hitting Mom up on Zoom instead this year.

Related Resources:





(11) New York Democratic Primary Canceled Because of COVID-19: What Are the Implications?
2020-05-06T09:05:45Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: New York State decided to cancel the democratic primaries amid the Coronavirus pandemic? Is this legal? Go to Findlaw.com for answers.

Written by: Maddy Teka, Esq.

Article:

A federal judge in New York overruled the state?s electoral board decision not to conduct a Democratic primary in New York this year. The electoral board?s decision would have made New York first state to cancel their primaries amid fears over COVID-19.  

Originally, the primaries were scheduled to take place on April 28. But the state issued an executive order postponing it to June 23 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The state of New York Board of Elections has decided to remove all candidates no longer seeking the presidency and cancel the Democratic primaries, thereby awarding former Vice President Joe Biden all the state's delegates.

This decision has faced opposition from previous candidates and their supporters who were planning to use the delegates to influence the party's platform at the convention in August.

Does the Law Allow the State to Remove Candidates?

The state of New York Board of elections relied on an executive order signed by Governor Cuomo when they decided to cancel the primaries originally scheduled to take place on June 23.

The executive order implies that the board has the power to remove from the ballot candidates who ended their presidential campaigns. It specifically states: ?If a candidate announces that they are terminating or suspending their campaign . . . the state board of elections may determine. . . that the candidate is no longer eligible and omit said candidate from the ballot."

The board claimed that, in addition to the increased risk to both voters and poll workers, there is no purpose in holding a general election since there is only one contender.

As the board's elections commissioner put it: ?Given the situation with the public health emergency that seems to exist now, [conducting the primaries with only one contender] seems to be unnecessary and frivolous."

Former Democratic candidate Andrew Yang and seven other New Yorkers filed a lawsuit claiming the decision is unconstitutional.

Is It Constitutional to Remove Candidates After They Suspend Their Campaigns?

With more than 24,000 deaths, New York is the epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S. Canceling the primary may indeed help prevent the spread of the virus. But does it give the state the right to cancel the primary if there is only one candidate left? Here are three arguments against it.

1. The 14th Amendment and the Right of Citizens to Vote

The 14th Amendment of the Constitution gives Americans ?equal protection of the laws." Those who oppose the board's decision may argue that the executive order is unconstitutional because it denies them their right to vote and be elected without compelling reasons.

They can argue that even though the pandemic is a real threat, the state has other alternatives to conduct the elections. These alternatives include absentee voting and holding elections through the mail.

2. The 14th Amendment Procedural Due Process Clause of the Constitution

The candidates can also argue that their constitutional rights have been violated without due process as other elections are scheduled to occur the same day, making the actions of the board fundamentally unfair.

3. Possible Implications for the General Election in November

There is a chance the November general election will be impacted, especially if COVID-19 remains a public health threat by that time. These implications could vary from conducting the entire election by mail to postponing the election date.

The lawsuit submitted by Andrew Yang claims the decision to cancel the primary creates a bad precedent. It further states that the president can use the same argument (i.e., that it is too dangerous to vote) to postpone the general elections in November.

New York District Court Judge Grants Preliminary Injunction

In an order that came out recently, a District Court judge agreed with allegations set forth by Andrew yang and eight other plaintiffs and ordered the board to reinstate the primaries. The judge stated cancellation of the primaries violates the plaintiffs? and other candidates' First and Fourteenth Amendment rights of the Constitution.

According to a statement by a co-chair of the board to the New York Times, the board of elections is ?reviewing the decision and preparing an appeal.?

How COVID-19 Has Affected Elections

COVID-19 is affecting all aspects of life, including shifting how national elections are conducted. As of now, 16 states have either postponed or canceled their primaries. Others have taken measures to conduct voting through the mail.

Alaska, Indiana, Maryland, and Delaware are among the states who postponed their primary election dates. Wisconsin, on the other hand, decided to go ahead with the elections after the Supreme Court blocked the governor's efforts to postpone the primaries.

We have yet to see how this pandemic will affect the general election in November.

Related Resources:





(12) Does Your College Have to Provide You With a Quality Online Class Experience?
2020-05-05T09:05:48Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: More than 25 colleges are facing lawsuits over the quality of their distance learning. Learn more on FindLaw's Law and Daily Life.

Written by: Andrew Leonatti

Article:

Students (and their parents) shell out tens of thousands of dollars a year for the college experience at America's elite public and private universities.

But all of it ? the classroom lectures, the campus organizations, the parties, the life lessons ? came to a screeching halt due to the coronavirus pandemic. In a flash, students everywhere went home to finish out the semester via online classes.

That change is not sitting well with all those young adults now trapped at home with their parents again. At least 25 universities across the country are now facing lawsuits from students arguing that their tuition and all the other expenses pays for much more than college credits.

Students Want Their Money Back

At the heart of nearly every lawsuit is the contention by students that the online learning experience does not compare to campus life, which means colleges need to return all of that money.

A freshman at Drexel University said that he felt "diminished" by an experience that doesn't compare to in-person learning.

In a lawsuit against the University of California system, a student argues that "Some professors are uploading pre-recorded lectures where students do not have a chance to interact, and some professors are simply uploading assignments with no video instruction at all."

The lead plaintiff in a $50 million class-action lawsuit against Northeastern University argues that distance learning is "inferior" for his master's degree in counseling psychology, because accreditation standards require in-person interaction.

Other elite universities ? including Brown, Cornell, Columbia, Purdue, and the University of Colorado ? are also facing lawsuits.

Skipping the Lawsuit

Instead of filing a lawsuit, a group of University of Chicago students took more drastic action, holding a tuition strike last week. The group of students is demanding a 50% reduction and waiving of fees, which together can total more than $78,000 a year.

While the university announced that it would waive room-and-board fees for the spring semester, that is not enough for the students. However, the university argues that tuition fees fund the university's operations, and without them, the university would have to make tough reductions in staffing and programs.

What Does a University Really Owe You?

The University of Chicago's argument is essentially what every university facing a lawsuit is saying: without your tuition, things will get a whole lot worse for the higher education system.

But what about the argument that online courses are inferior to in-person learning? Lawyers representing students contend that differences in pre-pandemic tuition price for in-person vs. distance learning proves that there is a difference in quality.

But the colleges argue that they are still fulfilling their mission: You pay your tuition to take classes and earn credits that go toward your degree. If that is the case, then many of these cases may not get very far in court.

The universities also say that they need more time and patience. Closures came on suddenly, and everyone, including administrators and professors, are learning how to navigate this new normal, and they had to create learning programs on the fly. It will be interesting to see what fall 2020 semesters look like if students must continue to stay away from campuses.

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(13) U.S. Citizens Married to Immigrants Not Getting Stimulus Checks
2020-04-30T14:04:17Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: While millions of stimulus checks have gone out, some U.S. citizens are missing out. Find out more on FindLaw's Law and Daily Life.

Written by: Andrew Leonatti

Article:

Stimulus checks of $1,200 are now flowing to Americans across the country, giving them a small financial lifeboat to help get through the coronavirus pandemic's upheaval of daily life.

But it turns out that there are millions of our fellow U.S. citizens�who will not be getting these checks. Many of the categories of people who will miss out (high-wage earners, students, many elderly and disabled people)�make sense. However, there was one group of Americans shocked to learn that they won't be getting financial relief: U.S. citizens married to immigrants who don't have Social Security numbers.

For them, it's hard to see this as anything other than discrimination by the federal government.

A Decision Affecting Millions

The move by the federal government will�deny checks to a large portion of the 1.2 million Americans�married to immigrants who lack legal status. The move by the Internal Revenue Service exempts those U.S. citizens who file their taxes separately from their spouse or those serving in the U.S. military.

In short: If your spouse does not have a Social Security number, and you filed your taxes jointly, you will not get a check. Nor will your U.S. citizen children, who were supposed to get $500 each.

"It's just fundamentally unfair, and it's really, really targeted to hurt," said American Families United President Randall Emery, whose organization advocates for these couples.

Lawsuit Accuses Government of Discrimination

The move to keep these people from getting stimulus funds, despite the fact that they work, pay taxes, and would otherwise qualify for them, has now sparked a lawsuit against the federal government.

The lawsuit,�filed in a Chicago federal court by a "John Doe,"�says the IRS denying him his check is unconstitutional and does not "treat him as equal to his fellow United States citizens based solely on whom he chose to marry."

Until that case works (or doesn't) its way through the courts, though, many of these couples have little recourse.

With the 2019 tax filing deadline pushed to July 15, if you are a U.S. citizen in this situation, the only thing you would be able to do is file your taxes separately from your spouse if you have not done so yet.

Related Resources:





(14) Can You Sue Telemarketers?
2020-04-28T10:04:47Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: ou can sue for robocalls that don't stop after you are on the Do Not Call list. FindLaw.com explains how and why you may want to consider pursuing it in small claims court.

Written by: Jaclyn Rainey

Article:

Ask any attorney, and they will likely agree that, yes, telemarketers are the worst. And the worst kind are the ones that use robodialers. It's like they don't even personally care that someone might be locked into a three-hour binge of "Cake Boss."

Fortunately, if you've had enough of robocalling, there's a good chance that you might actually be able to take legal action. This is especially true after you've asked for the calls to stop or signed up for the National Do Not Call Registry.

What Is a Robodialer?

A "robodialer" or "robocaller" is a system that calls large amounts of people at once and finds free phone lines. It does not require a phone number to be typed in.

Imagine a huge list of phone numbers, and the automated system is auto-dialing phone calls to whoever is free. This is great for call centers and scams, but not great for anyone receiving the spam calls.

Once the dialing system finds someone to pick up, they may have:

Many of these systems will leave a voicemail if you do not answer. In a scam, the "caller" might act like there is a problem or ask you to "press one" and follow the prompts to do something unwise, like enter your credit card number.

It Is Illegal to Call Someone After They Say "Stop"

Some scammers know it is illegal to call you nonstop, but they do not care. Other auto-dialers realize you are on a do-not-call list but try to find ways around it. Companies can also mask their phone number and hang up if you ask them to stop calling. All of this is illegal, and you can try to sue.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) makes any robocall illegal that is trying to sell you something and does not have your written permission to call you. If you get one of these calls, you should hang up and file a complaint with the FTC

You can also add yourself to the National Do Not Call Registry if you haven't already. Note that the law allows telemarketers to make a mistake one time, so the first time you are called after being put on the registry is generally forgiven.

The FTC, FCC, and TCPA Are on Your Side Against Harassing Phone Calls

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) also accepts complaints and works to protect consumers by stopping calls from spammers. You can learn more about the FCC rules on robocalls, including:

The Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) updated its rules in 2013 to include recorded spam calls and texts. You can stay updated on their recent changes to understand when you are receiving illegal robocalls, messages, or texts.

Taking Telemarketers to Small Claims Court

Believe it or not, some people have been rather successful at taking telemarketers to small claims court. The TCPA allows payment of penalties to the call recipient ($500 per violation). So if you can track down where the call came from, you may be able to make some money off telemarketers that don't stop calling after you tell them to.

As one hero in the fight against telemarketing calls will attest to, it does take time and effort. But, gathering the evidence is relatively easy, and winning at small claims court can be simple if you gather the right evidence.

If you plan to go to court, you should:

Once you ask to be removed from the call list, any more calls (they are allowed one mistake call to you) can result in $500 in fines paid to you.

Suing for Overly Eager Robo-Collection

You may be able to sue if you have a debt collector, debt collection agency, or a company's collection department calling you too often. For example, a furniture store may have sold you items on a store credit card. Now you have to make payments. If you fall behind (or even if you make payments but the system makes a mistake), you could be called numerous times a day by a robo-collector.

Some people try blocking the numbers, but many systems can change the number they call from to get around this. A store's automated collections system could call someone multiple times a day for years.

In some cases, that's illegal. There are specific rules debt collectors must follow when calling to collect on a debt: 

A person sued a company in 2019 for this scenario. After the maddening amount of calls, she won nearly half a million dollars.

Hiring a Lawyer to Fight Telemarketing Calls

If you are bombarded with telemarketing calls and have already signed up on the Do Not Call Registry, you may want to consult with an attorney to see if you can get the calls to stop.

The legal issues involved are rather specific. You should interview any potential attorney you hire to make sure they are actually experienced in handling this sort of matter.

An attorney can save you time by filing documents, creating demand letters, filing the lawsuit, or joining a class action against a company. It may take a few hundred dollars of an attorney's time to get you thousands of dollars back in the settlement ? and the end of those unwanted calls.

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(15) What Will Be the Effects of the Executive Order Suspending Immigration to the U.S.?
2020-04-27T15:04:19Z(last updated)
Brief capsule: After a 26 million people filed for employment, President Trump issued an executive order limiting immigration to the US. What are the effects of this order?

Written by: Maddy Teka, Esq.

Article:

President Trump has signed an�executive order�temporarily suspending certain immigrant visas as a measure to protect American jobs amid the COVID-19 pandemic. This order comes after a staggering�26 million people�have already applied for unemployment benefits.

What Will Be the Effects of the Executive Order?

The order, which was issued April 22 and will be effective for 60 days, bans people seeking immigrant visas from entering the country. This order applies to people who:

Some Groups Are Exempted From the Ban

The executive order does not apply to some groups seeking immigrant visas. These include:

The Ban Does Not Apply to Those Seeking Non-Immigrant Visas

This temporary pause in immigration does not apply to those who are coming in with temporary visas. This includes those coming with�temporary worker visas�and tourist visas.

The order, however, requires the Secretaries of State, Labor, and Homeland Security to review these visas and recommend to the president, within 30 days, what measures should be taken to ensure ?the prioritization, hiring and employment" of U.S. workers.

Does the President Have Authority to Issue This Proclamation?

The president probably has the authority to suspend immigration during a health emergency. The proclamation specifically states this authority is vested in the president pursuant to:

?The Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including sections 212(f) and 215(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, 8 USC. 1182(f) and 1185(a), and section 301 of title 3, United States Code."

If this executive order is challenged in court, however, the president would have to show why allowing these immigrants would be detrimental to U.S. interests.

Other Actions Curtailing Immigration During COVID-19

The Trump administration's response to COVID-19 has included, among other things, a number of ways to curtail entry into the country.

These measures include:

These measures, as many argue, have essentially amounted to a hold on immigration even before this executive order was issued.

What will happen to immigrant visa applications that were already filed is not yet known. What is known is people approved for green cards will not be allowed to enter the country for the next 60 days.

If you are not sure whether this order applies to you, it might be best to speak to an immigration attorney.

Related Resources: